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Lee Doong Hee
Lee Doong Hee was born to Lee Ah Song (father) in 1877 at Portland, Oregon. She left for China in 1881. She returned on the steamship City of Peking and arrived in San Francisco on June 19, 1887. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for her landing. Hoo Poy petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on June 22, 1887. A bond was posted. Judge Southard Hoffman ordered Discharge on July 26, 1887. Lee was allowed to remain in the country. Detainee was represented Lyman Mowry .

Jin Ah Yen
Jin Ah Yen was born to Jin Ah Lum (father) and Lee Shee (mother) in 1867 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on November 8, 1881 on the steamship Belgic. He returned on the steamship City of Sydney and arrived in San Francisco on November 7, 1889. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Jin Ah Fook petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on November 25, 1889. A bond was posted. Ward McAllister, Jr. Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on January 30, 1890. Detainee was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On January 31, 1890, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Lee Quan Dy
Lee Quan Dy was born to Lee Hee Soon (father) and Wang Shee (mother) in 1866 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on October 19, 1887 on the steamship Oceanic. He returned on the steamship City of Rio de Janeiro and arrived in San Francisco on April 20, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Lee Quan Dy, uncle, petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on April 24, 1890. A bond was posted. Ward McAllister, Jr., Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on May 2, 1890. Detainee was represented by Lyman Mowry. On May 2, 1890, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Wong Wah Deok
Wong Wah Deok was born to Wong Dit Sai (father) in 1876 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on January 7, 1882 on the steamship City of Tokyo. He returned on the steamship City of Rio de Janeiro and arrived in San Francisco on April 20, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Wong Wing Yan petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on April 25, 1890. A bond was posted. Detainee was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On August 7, 1891, an Order of Remand was issued to instruct the Marshall to send detainee back to China. The Marshall was unable to find the detainee in his district.

Lee Gin
Lee Gin was born to Lee Gin Fook (father) and Jeong Shee (mother) in 1870 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on January 1, 1882 on the steamship Devonshire. He returned on the steamship China and arrived in San Francisco on May 12, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Young Fong petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on May 19, 1890. A bond was posted. Ward McAllister, Jr., Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on May 31, 1890. He was represented by F. E. Stranahan. On May 31, 1890, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Soo Yow
Soo Yow was born to Soo Mung (father) and Chin Shee (mother) in 1867 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on March 22, 1879 on the steamship Oceanic. He returned on the steamship Gaelic and arrived in San Francisco on July 9, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing.Leong Gut petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on July 17, 1890. A bond was posted.Ward McAllister, Jr., Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on January 20, 1891. He was represented by F.E, Stranahan. On January 20, 1891, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Young Teong
Young Teong was born to Young Quong Witt (father) and Jung Shee (mother) in 1867 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on December 4, 1880 on the steamship City of Tokyo. He returned on the steamship China and arrived in San Francisco on July 19, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Wong Gook petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on July 29, 1890. A bond of was posted. He was represented by F.E. Stranahan. On May 6, 1891, an Order of Remand ordered him to return to China. On June 2, 1891, he was placed on the City of Peking bound for Hong Kong.

Ng Leow
Ng Leow was born to Ng Ock Shim (father) and Jew Shee (mother) in 1873 at Portland, Oregon. He left for China on February 20, 1882 on the ship Suez. He returned on the steamship Oceanic and arrived in San Francisco on August 25, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Liew Fook petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on August 30, 1890. S.C. Houghton, Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Remand on October 26, 1891. He was represented by F.E. Stranahan. On October 26, 1891 an Order of Remand instructed the Marshal to send the detainee back to China. The Marshall was not able to find the detainee.

Fong Gwong Loy
Fong Gwong Loy was born to Fong Sing Leong (father) and Lum See (mother) in 1873 at Portland. He left for China on October 29, 1880 on the steamship City of Peking. He returned on the steamship Gaelic and arrived in San Francisco on September 17, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing.Jare Gwong petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on September 29, 1890. A bond was posted. S. C. Houghton, Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on October 26, 1891. He was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On October 26, 1891, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Fong Gwong Sing
Fong Gwing Sing was born to Fong Sing Leong (father) and Lum See (mother) in 1870 at Portand, Oregon. He left for China on October 29, 1880 on the steamship City of Peking. He returned on the steamship Gaelic and arrived in San Francisco on September 17, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing. Jare Gwong petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on September 29, 1890. A bond was posted. S. C. Houghton, Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on October 26, 1891.He was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On October 26, 1891, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Chun Hee Kow
Chun Hee Kow was born to Chun Jow (father) and Haw Shee (mother) in 1873 at Portland. He left for China on September 20, 1880 on the steamship City of Tokyo. He returned on the steamship Gaelic and arrived in San Francisco on September 17, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing.Jung Ling petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on September 29, 1890. A bond was posted.S.C. Houghton, Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on September 24, 1891. He was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On September 24, 1891, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Dong Ah Sin
Dong Ah Sin was born to Dong Ying Share (father) and Lee Shee (mother) in 1879 at Portland. He left for China on November 8, 1881 on the vessel Coloma. He returned on the steamship Oceanic and arrived in San Francisco on November 1, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing.Dong Ty Duck petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on November 7, 1890. A bond was posted.S.C. Houghton, Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on July 20, 1891. He was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On July 20, 1891, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.

Yung Fong
Yung Fong was born to Yeong Sin Young (father) and Len See (mother) in 1874 at Portland. He left for China on February 25, 1882 on the steamship the ship Suez. He returned on the steamship Oceanic and arrived in San Francisco on November 1, 1890. The Collector of the Port of San Francisco refused permission for his landing.Yung Kee petitioned for a Writ of Habeas Corpus on November 11, 1890. A bond of was posted. S.C. Houghton, Special Referee and Examiner, recommended Discharge on August 31, 1891. He was represented by Alfred Ricketts. On August 31, 1891, an Order of Discharge allowed him to remain in the country.