YEAR 1860

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1860 Federal Census compiled on June 11, 1860 in 6th Ward of Rochester, Monroe County, New York.
Name Age Gender Occupation Real Estate Personal Assets Birthplace
Barlow B. Bee 45 Male Harness Maker $3,000 $1,500 New York
Mary W. Bee 35 Female none $1,500 none New York
Adelaide Bee 16 Female none none none New York
Elizabeth Bee 14 Female none none none New York
George Bee 11 Male none none none New York
Millard Fillmore Bee 5 Male none none none New York
Luisa 3 Female none none None New York
Woodburn Jinks 19 Male Harness Maker none none New York
James Lilly 22 Male Harness Maker none none Ohio
Herman Lilly 21 Male Harness Maker none none Germany


1860 Federal Census compiled on June 18, 1860 in Kirkland, Oneida County, New York.
Name Age Gender Occupation Real Estate Personal Assets Birthplace
George Haver 46 Male Carriage maker $4,500 1,000 France
Mary Haver 41 Female none none $1,000 New York
Elizabeth Haver 20 Female Music teacher none none New York
Louisa Haver 17 Female Music teacher none none New York
Frances Haver 14 Female none none none New York
Albert A Haver 12 Male none none none New York
Mary W. Bee 75 Female Mother-in-law none none New York
Richard Bee 50 Male Tailor none none New York
Frederick Gephardt 47 Male Wheelwright none none Germany


Frederick Bee and Family were not included in the 1860 Federal Census because they were traveling.

I could not find an entry for Albert Bee's family in the 1860 Federal Census.

On the Contact of Races - John Archbald was an accountant.
Newspaper article

Good summary of overland telegraph

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 26, 27 January 1860
F. A. Bee, President of Placerville and St. Josephs Telegraph Company, in Washington DC to request government aid

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 37, 7 February 1860
F A Bee in Washington, DC

Excerpt
New York, February 13, 1860
Hiram Sibley,
Please ask Mr. Bee what terms he will make for 2,000 words per week from the end of his line to San Francisco and how much for additional words – also how much for 2,000 words per week this way from San Francisco to Virginia City and for additional words. Craig leaves all the arrangements to be made by me and unless we attend to it they may fizzle as before at the outset.
Charles M. Stebbins
Courtesy Rush Rhees Library 231, University of Rochester

Leavenworth & Pike's Peak Express, the organizers of the Pony Express applied for articles of incorporation by the legislature of Kansas territory, which were passed by that body and approved by Gov. S. Medary February 13, 1860.
and
F. A. Bee employed by Pony Express.

An act to incorporate the Central Overland California and Pike's Peak Express Company

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 18, Number 2781, 24 February 1860
F A Bee in Washington, D. C.

December, 1860 Harper's New Monthly Magazine
A Peep at Washoe by John Ross Browne
Crossing the Sierra in Spring of 1860

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 18, Number 2795, 12 March 1860
Dr. Chorpenning deceived the Post Office

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 18, Number 2796, 13 March 1860
Proposition in front of Senate Post Office Committee for telegraph line from Missouri to Sacramento

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 72, 13 March 1860
Article about proposed legislation

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 18, Number 2797, 14 March 1860
Article about proposed legislation

March 17, 1860 VINCENNES GAZETTE
WASHINGTON, March 12.—An earnest and probably a successful effort is making by the Government, in conjunction with the leading telegraph gentleman of the country, to insure the prompt completion of a substantial line of telegraph from the Mississippi to San Francisco.
There are now present in this city in consultation upon this subject, Hiram Sibley, President of the Western Union Co.; Z. Barnum, President of the American Company; T. R. Walker, President of the New York, Albany and Buffalo Company; Dr. Green, of the New Orleans and Louisville Company, and Colonel Bee , President of the California Line; Judge Seldom, of Rochester, T. S. Faxton, of Utica; Cyrus W. Field, of New York; E. Connell, of Ithica, and others.

"Telegraph Convention" mentioned in this article written on March, 19, 1860.

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 80, 21 March 1860
T.D.Judah, William Gwin, A. W. Bee, Mr.Chorpening, Manuel M. Noah and F A Bee were sojourning in Washington, D.C.
From "The California News-Telegraph Monopoly, 1860-1870", Southern California Quarterly, Winter 1976
MacCrellish brought the Union and Bulletin to terms when it became apparent that the Pony Express along the Central route would replace the Overland Mail. His paper had been the champion of that route. Beginning in 1858 it invested $10,000 in the Placerville and Humboldt Telegraph Company. Earlyin 1860 the paper sent Manuel M. Noah, Jr. to Washington. Working Major Albert W. Bee, General Agent of the Placerville company, he arranged for the Pacific Associated Press to have the "exclusive overland mail facilities in connection with the Pony Express." Simonton urged Latham to have his arrangement "broken up at once." Latham had his authority to offer Bee up to $300 a month for "the exclusive news over his wires … for twenty-four hours after the arrival of each express at the Carson Valley Station." Hardly had this letter of March 5 reached Washington, when the first Pony Express rider headed west out of St. Joseph, Missouri, on April 3, 1860. He arrived in Carson City at 3:30 pm on the 12th and cut the news time to nine days.
The Union of March 22, 1860, offered its exclusive dispatch to all other journals- provided they took it entire, like the Alta and Bulletin. It seems that by then the Alta had abandoned it former impecunious partners and joined the Bulletin and Union in the California Associated Press. They sent Simonton east to further secure their news and telegraph arrangements. He left California May 5, 1860, for a month, and then permanently November 1, 1860. Residing in Washington and New York, he acted as the Bulletin's correspondent and protected the monopoly from any appeals to the New York Associated Press or Western Union.

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 83, 24 March 1860
Placerville and St. Josephs Telegraph Company appointed Charles Crane as Dispatch Agent

Kitty Bee, daughter of Albert Bee, died on March 25, 1860. She was born on March 15, 1859.

March 26, 1860 New York Herald

Frederick Bee letter dated November 30, 1858 to Honorable William Gwin
AND
Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 87, 28 March 1860
Colonel Bee in Washington to support bill that had provision to support telegraph
I received this email on September 4, 2012, "I checked in the Witness Index 1837-1966 microfiche and the Witness search in the ProQuest Congressional database. They do not list Frederick Bee as ever having testified in a Congressional Hearing.On the microfiche, I scanned all of the Bees who have ever testified, to double check under initials, etc. and he was not listed. Best regards,Paul Rascoe,Government Documents Librarian, University of Texas Libraries

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 88, 29 March 1860
A.S. Gould appointed agent of Overland Telegrpaph Company via Salt Lake. (same as in 1859)

The first Pony Express mail run happened on April 3, 1860.

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2821, 11 April 1860
Ebeneezer Clappp died in Dorchester, Massachusetts. Albert W. Bee married Sophronia Louise Clapp of Dorchester, MA in 1852.

Los Angeles Star, Volume IX, Number 50, 21 April 1860
Colonel Bee and telegraph bill

Excerpt
Washington, D. C. , May 11, 1860
Hiram Sibley, Esq.
The interest of my brother and myself in this bill is so inconsiderable that I do not see clearly how we are to be recompensed for the time and money spent even if the bill does pass. I am determined to stand by the bill to the last and let the future take care of itself.
Albert W. Bee
Courtesy Rush Rhees Library 231, University of Rochester

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2849, 14 May 1860
Massacre of Americans
and
Sand In A Whirlwind, 30Th Anniversary Edition: The Paiute Indian War Of 1860

June 12, 1860
Amendment to Telegraph Act proposed by Senator Gwin mentions Frederick Bee and others.
Interesting mention of patents

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2876, 14 June 1860
Chorpenning mail contract annulled.

June 16, 1860
Pacific Telegraph Act of 1860

Excerpt
New York June 23, 1860
Hiram Sibley, Esq.
Rochester, New York
My brother left on the steamer on the 30th. He has left me to act in this matter as I may think best. We are neither of us willing to take the contract from Govt, according to the terms of the bill at much less than the sum limited.
We have as yet come to no understanding with anyone in regard to putting in a bid.
Albert W. Bee
Courtesy Rush Rhees Library 231, University of Rochester

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 193, 13 July 1860
Bees returned to San Francisco along with T. D. Judah.
and
Book by T.D. Judah
and
More about T. D. Judah

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2900, 13 July 1860
Special mention of the return of F A Bee and family

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 193, 13 July 1860
Steamer Golden Age passenger list

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2900, 13 July 1860
Steamer Golden Age passenger list

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2901, 14 July 1860
Colonel Bee predicted that Russell, Majors & Co. will get the contract the Overland Mail on the Central Route.

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 194, 14 July 1860
Colonel Bee commented on the Pony Express.

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2940, 29 August 1860
Telegraph line to Utah to be finished soon (an article about the Pony Express also)

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 19, Number 2948, 7 September 1860
Pacific and St. Joseph Telegraph Company [election of officers]

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 252, 10 September 1860
Peace with the Paiutes

September 13, 1860 Nashville Union and American
Washington, September 11 . – The Secretary of the Treasury opened the bids for the construction and use of a telegraph line to the Pacific. The proposal of Hiram Sibley, representing the Western Union Telegraph Line, was in accordance with the minimum sum in the act of Congress, viz: $40,000 per annum and $3.00 for a single dispatch of ten words, with the usual proportionate deduction upon dispatches of greater length. The other Adams, of Harrisburg, Pa., bids $30,000 per annum for ten years. Orville Clark, of Sandy Hill, N.Y. and J. H. Harman of Detroit, $25,000 for ten years; B. J. Ficklin, of St. Joseph, makes three bids – in the first, $25,000 per annum, for ten years; second, $40,000, and to transmit all government dispatches at $1.50 for the first ten words, with the usual deduction on those of greater length; and the 3d $40,000, accompanied with a proposition to run a pony express after the first 500 miles of the line is finished, at the usual telegraphic rates, until the line is completed. For this, however, this act makes no provision. There were present at the opening of the bid, Messrs. Sibley, Ficklin, J. S. Graham, and A.W. Bee. The last named is connected with the Placerville and St. Joseph lines. The Secretary of the Treasury will probably make his decision the last of this week.
Wikipedia entry about John H. Harmon
Benjamin F. Ficklin
Wikipedia entry for Orville Clark

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 3874, 21 September 1860
Article about Placerville and Bee as a naturalist

Cleveland Morning Leader., September 24, 1860
By some management probably understood by the the bidders and profitable to all concerned, the contract for the construction of the Pacific Telegraph line has fallen into the hands of Hiram Sibley of Rochester, NY, instead of John Harmon of Detroit, the lowest bidder. Mr. Sibley is the President of the Western Union Telegraph Company, which now owns between eleven and twelve thousand miles of wires, and also the controlling stock in the lines west of St. Louis, now being rapidly extended under the management of C. M. Stebbins, toward California. Isaac R. Elwood of Rochester is Secretary and Treasurer, and J. H. Wade of Cleveland, the General Agent. The Commercial says:
The General Superintendant is Anson Stager, formerly of Cincinnati, now resident at Cleveland, one of the most accomplished Telegraphers of the time. E. Cobb of Chicago and Charles Davenport of Cincinnati are Assistant Superintendants. The fact that the contract for the payment of forty thousand dollars per annum for ten years, on the part of the United States Government , for the conveyance of its dispatches between the western borders of the Missouri and the Pacific coast, is not to be executed until the line is completed, has secured this great undertaking from falling into the hands of such parties as are accustomed to speculate upon government contracts, and has given it into the charge of those legitimately engaged and interested in the business of telegraphing - From such observation as we have been able to make for a number of years, of the management of the affair of this company, and from its acknowledged reputation of a sort of sturdy progressive energy, we cannot but feel strongly disposed to commend the judgement of Secretary Cole in making the award.
We learn that it is with the expressed consent and approval of all the important telegraph interests of the country, that the Western Union Company has assumed the accomplishment of this splendid project.
Read about Anson Stager and Western Electric.

Excerpt
Boston September 24, 1860
Hiram Sibley, Esq.
The long agony is over and we are victorious at last, and it is now for us to make good use of the advantage we have garnered. I came through New York on Saturday and our success was a subject of general congratulations among Telegraph Men.
It has not been decided when we shall meet in Rochester to organize our Company. Tuesday or Wednesday of next week would suit me and seem to be as soon as we could get together.
Albert W. Bee
Courtesy Rush Rhees Library 231, University of Rochester

September 24, 1860
George Washington Carmack, one of the discoverers of gold in the Yukon, was born near Port Costa, California. Port Costa is in Contra Costa County and abuts Martinez.

Martinez, California and the Pony Express

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 2966, 28 September 1860
Mr. Sibley and parties underbidding him

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 3881, 28 September 1860
Bids for national telegraph system

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 2977, 11 October 1860
FA Bee arrived in Carson Valley to extend telegraph

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 2981, 16 October 1860
A.W.Bee, Sibley and John Dwinelle are mentioned in this article.
F. A. Bee and John Dwinelle both attended Hamilton College. A.W. Bee worked with Hiram Sibley of Western Union. Western Union was headquartered in Rochester, NY. John Dwinelle was living in Rochester, NY at this time. John Dwinelle voted on a law to allow the heirs of AW Bee sell or mortgage real estate in 1868.

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 3906, 23 October 1860
Congratulations to Messrs Sibley and A.W. Bee regarding the telegraph

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 2987, 23 October 1860
Extension of telegraph

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 2987, 23 October 1860
Status of telegraph in California

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 3021, 1 December 1860
Messrs. Bee accused of making exorbitant demands for the telegraph line.

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 3022, 3 December 1860
Major A W Bee on Uncle Sam passenger list

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 3023, 4 December 1860
Central route

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 3023, 4 December 1860
Refer to December 1, 1860 article.
Two routes for telegraph

December 5, 1860 Mountain Democrat
Accusations against the Bee brothers

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 3950, 6 December 1860
Martinez, California in 1860
Note: I do not know if S.S. Foster was the same S. S. Foster who was the American consul to Samoa.
and
Martinez, California and Pony Express

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 3951, 7 December 1860
A. W. Bee returned on the Uncle Sam.

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 3028, 10 December 1860
Complaints about Placerville and Humboldt Telegraph Company

Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 20, Number 3034, 17 December 1860
F A Bee responded to criticism of Placerville and Humboldt Telegraph Company

December 20, 1860
South Carolina seceded from the Union.

Daily Alta California, Volume 12, Number 3965, 21 December 1860
Extracts of Postmaster General Report about California





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